The Truth About the McDonald’s Coffee Case

I can’t remember how long I’ve been familiar with this incident in its urban legend form, but this video from “Adam Ruins Everything” sheds some light on the actual facts. If you’re not familiar with it, the story goes that a woman bought some coffee from McDonald’s and sued when she spilled it on her lap, prompting people everywhere to bemoan the susceptibility of the American legal system to frivolous lawsuits. The details are more horrible—and sinister—than that.

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What I Learned about My iPhone After Switching to the Google Pixel

Google Pixel

Carrying around two phones is one of those things that I’ve always associated only with a certain class of dork, but right now that’s me. Along with my iPhone, I’ve been toting around a Google Pixel phone everywhere I go and, as much as I can, I’ve tried to make it my primary device. Everything that I would normally turn to my iPhone for, I try to turn to my Pixel for.

I did this in part to learn more about Android; even though this isn’t my first Android device (I’ve owned two others and a tablet), it’s the first one that from the outset looked like it stood the best chance of legitimately replacing my iPhone. Everything from the build quality to the subtle but meaningful extra attention and care paid to the operating system felt closer to the iPhone than I’ve seen before.

To be sure, it’s a terrific phone. It has a world class still camera that just about lives up to its hype, and to me the operating system has never felt as united with its hardware as it does in this phone.

As much as I tried though, after living with this device for several weeks I still felt that there were several stumbling blocks to jumping entirely to Android. Whether you consider it lock-in or value-add, Apple’s ecosystem is a powerful argument for sticking with the iPhone.

Everyone talks about iMessage being the most compelling argument for Apple’s ecosystem and I found that to be absolutely true. I had hoped that Google’s new Allo messaging product would be a worthy contender, but it fell far short. Allo doesn’t match iMessage’s key strength—the ability to abstract your account—the place where you send and receive messages—from the device. By contrast you can use one iMessage account on multiple devices (I count five devices for my account) and send and receive messages on all of them, but each Allo instance is tied to a single phone number and device, so there’s no device switching, and certainly no receiving Allo messages on my desktop. Learning that was a disappointment and pretty much meant the end of the argument for switching entirely to Android. iMessage is a huge advantage for Apple.

I also discovered something interesting about Google’s much vaunted strength in services: sometimes it’s no better than Apple’s. As an iTunes Match user, I’ve long bemoaned Apple’s inability to make automatic syncing of my music library between devices truly seamless and glitch free. It’s gotten better over the years, but it’s still prone to oddball errors and quirks which, in the past, always made me wish that Google was powering the service instead.

In reality Google’s vaunted strength in services is sometimes no better than Apple’s.Twitter

When I got the Pixel I figured I could use Google Play Music syncing for the same purpose—to get the contents of my music library to the Pixel. To my surprise, Google does an even poorer job than Apple. Among the problems I encountered: albums show up in multiple parts; tracks are missing; corrected meta information doesn’t get synced etc. To be fair, Google Play Music syncing is still mostly usable; it just failed to live up to my expectations for Google’s services prowess.

Another thing that surprised me was the experience of using Android’s lock screen notifications, which in the past I’ve admired and found more powerful than those on iOS. They’ve generally been richer and more capable where for a long time iOS lock screen notifications were fairly limited. That is, until iOS 10 overhauled its notification system. Aesthetically, the new notifications interface actually doesn’t look as good, to me, as it did in iOS 9. But I hadn’t realized until I started using the Pixel how very good its interactions are in general. By and large, iOS 10 notifications are easy to use and understand: if you see something on the lock screen you can take action on it and that clears all the other notifications. If you missed a notification, you can access it again by pulling down from the top of the screen once the phone is unlocked.

Android notification behavior, on the other hand, is harder to predict. They tend to stick around even after you’ve engaged with them, and worse, they reshuffle all the time, sometimes right before your eyes. It’s relatively difficult to clear them all too, unless you effectively view (or at least scan) all of them. In the end, I found it disappointing that a system that I had liked previously had turned into something more complex than I feel is really necessary.

None of which is to say that the Pixel is a bad phone. If you’re predisposed towards Android, or don’t enjoy iOS, the Pixel presents a superb overall experience. But I had hoped that, despite my predilection towards Apple, I would be able to find a viable alternative should I ever want to jump ship. I still hope that Android evolves into that, because I think that makes for a much more interesting market. For now though, even though I’m still carrying around my Pixel, my iPhone remains my main device.

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Women Who Draw

Women Who Draw

Women Who Draw is an open directory of freelance professional illustrators, artists and cartoonists—who all happen to be female. It was created a by “a group of women artists in an effort to increase the visibility of female illustrators, female illustrators of color, LBTQ+, and other minority groups of female illustrators.” It’s a fantastic resource for anyone who needs to hire illustrators but also a pleasure to browse at your leisure.

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The Last Six Minutes in the Life of a Band

Beloved indie band Allo Darlin’ have decided to call it quits after eight years. They made three three exceptionally tuneful albums that were also complex and rewarding in the way that the best songcraft always is. Here is a fan-shot video of the very end of their farewell concert in London over the weekend; it’s bursting with both joy and sadness in every note, handclap and dance step.

As a parting gift, the band have also released their last ever single, a lovingly wrought number called “Hymn on the 45,” available over at bandcamp.com. A bittersweet au revoir to a special band, and more proof that 2016 marks the end of all good things.

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Typography in the Wild

Typography in the Wild

I was at a winter fair at my daughter’s school over the weekend and spotted a bin full of plastic letters with magnets attached to the back, the kind you’d put on a refrigerator door. I got lucky with the lighting and captured this photo with my new Google Pixel phone (more about which later).

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Movies Watched, November 2016

Still from “The Handmaiden”

November was a good time to lose myself in film and try to forget about the outside world. I even made it to theaters four times, where I saw three of the best movies of the year (I wrote about them in this post) and one of the least consequential (rhymes with “proctor mange”). I also spent a lot of time on the bountiful new streaming service FilmStruck, a haven for cinephiles that was a source of great comfort. In total, I watched nineteen flicks.

If you’re interested, here’s my list from October, September, August, July, June, May, April, March and my list for January and February. And you can follow along with my film diary on Letterboxd, too, where I rate and sometimes write slightly longer (but not very long) reviews of these films.

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In the Future Graphic Design Layout Will Be Automated

DesignScape is an experimental system from Adobe Research and the computer science department at the University of Toronto. Its purpose is to demonstrate a system that “aids the design process by making interactive layout suggestions, i.e., changes in the position, scale, and alignment of elements.” The user is presented with a set of elements typical to most design problems—a headline, blocks of text, logo, icons and illustrations, contact information, etc. As these are manipulated, the system automatically generates new layout suggestions based on the input. The user can choose one of the suggestions to further refine, at which point the system generates still more suggestions. It’s like having a design assistant at your side as you figure out a layout problem. Watch this video to see it in action.

The examples here are crude, both in the quality of the basic elements and in the suggestions that are generated by the system. But watching the video, it’s apparent that there’s a respectable “layout intelligence” at work here; the system is making reasonably well-informed decisions about how the elements should be placed in relation to one another, resized, aligned etc.

In fact the “quality” of the design decision-making in DesignScape is based on data gathered through asking humans to produce layouts via Mechanical Turk. It’s easy to imagine that a wider scale effort involving more designers and/or more qualified designers could, at some point, produce much more refined outputs.

Even so, what’s on display here all seems fairly academic until it’s demonstrated on a tablet. Fine tuned manipulation of design elements is difficult on touch surfaces; in this context, the idea of assisted graphic design layout suddenly seems not only viable but desirable. Rather than something that might come someday in the future, it suddenly feels like something that could make sense now.

It seems safe to say that while a certain segment of graphic design will never be completely replaced by automated systems, at some point in the near future systems like this will become commonplace, either as a replacement for lower-dollar design needs, or even as a complement to big ticket design processes. Remember, there was a time when many of the world’s most famous graphic designers scoffed at the idea of ever needing a personal computer to do their work.

Learn more about DesignScape, and read the paper, at dgp.toronto.edu.

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The Devil’s in the Dashed Line Details

Adobe’s marquee apps like Photoshop and Illustrator get a lot of criticism, sometimes deservedly and sometimes not. But they’re still workhorses for millions of people, and as a reader reminded me recently, often they feature the kind of attention to detail that really matters to designers, even in the smallest ways.

Sometimes it’s the little things. Illustrator has the ability to align dashes to corners. For the life of me, I can find no other Mac graphics program (Affinity Designer, Omnigraffle, Graphic [Autodesk], …) that has a similar feature. Am I missing something?

I hadn’t realized this, but this reader is totally right. I revisited this feature recently to see for myself. Here’s a 150 px square with a 1px thick dashed line that breaks for 5 pt every 15 pt. Notice how the corners are not uniform.

Dashed Lines in Adobe Illustrator without Corner Details Applied

Here’s the same square, with the catchily named “Align dashes to corners and path ends, adjusting lengths to fit” option turned on. The result: pretty corners.

Dashed Lines in Adobe Illustrator with Corner Details Applied

And here’s that square again, with dashes that are 75 pt long instead. The dashes magically align with the corners and the midpoints of each segment of the square.

Dashed Lines in Adobe Illustrator

In each of the last two cases, product designers, managers and engineers sweated over the details to make sure the output matches the designer’s intent. That’s a rare quality—even amongst the many newcomers to the design tools space who are clearly as passionate about creative tools as Adobe is. This is not to say that Adobe apps do not have lots of work ahead to be simpler, more performant, more in tune with what users want. It’s just to say that creating software for designers requires an extraordinary amount of attention to even the smallest details; you have to account for nearly every detail that every designer would ever want to finesse. You know how designers are; we’re fussy.

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Three Current Movies for Our Current World

Movie Still from “Moonlight”

Frankly, I’m depressed. The whole idea of a “President Trump” has left me adrift, has dimmed my hope. My reaction has been denial, excessive devotion to my to-do list, and turning to film. Luckily, the gray that comes with the end of the year—and in the weeks since the eighth of November, it’s been unbearably dark and cold—can be reliably tempered by the harvest of the “serious” film season. I’ve seen some extraordinary movies in the past month, two of which feel like they mark the end of an era, and a third that will almost certainly come to be regarded as timeless.

Before election day, I went to see Barry Jenkins’s exquisite, tender “Moonlight,” a coming-of-age tale about a gay, African American boy growing up in poverty in Miami. Jenkins’s last feature was 2008’s “Medicine for Melancholy,” a mumblecore-esque melodrama that I found charming yet overly careful. So I wasn’t prepared for how confident and unhesitating his work in “Moonlight” is; it’s powerful and engrossing without compromising the authenticity of its subject matter in the least. It also now seems, in the aftermath of the election, like a closing chapter in the Obama era, a time when LGBT progress seemed destined to make greater and greater strides for years.

Movie Still from “Arrival”

I also saw, on opening weekend, Denis Villeneuve’s “Arrival,” the story of a linguist wrestling with the personal and geopolitical implications of trying to communicate with aliens who have landed on Earth. Villeneuve directed the nearly perfect “Sicario,” one of my favorite movies of last year, and in “Arrival” you can still see the same pitch perfect directorial instincts: a keen feeling for naturalism and the ability to challenge the audience without sliding into the inscrutable. Maybe the most notable thing about “Arrival” though is a kind of movie magic that often goes unappreciated: insanely fortuitous release timing. Sometimes, the erratic, lurching path of filmmaking somehow produces a piece of work that is perfectly suited for the very day it debuts. This story of a desperate, international scramble to deeply understand and communicate with one another bowed in theaters just days after a dramatic shift away from empathy, from internationalism, like a commentary on what could have been. It might actually make your mourning even more difficult, actually.

Promotional Image from “The Handmaiden”

To me, these two movies are a coda for the past eight years; products of an era of open-mindedness and intellect. The third movie I saw is perhaps better suited for the next four years in that it’s an intoxicatingly effective piece of escapist entertainment: Park Chan-Wook’s surprisingly romantic “The Handmaiden.” From the very first scene, in which a poor Korean girl leaves a makeshift family to go work in the grand home of a rich and twisted master, this movie upends expectations and roles repeatedly. The initial half hour or so, which dives into the societal distortions of Japanese-occupied Korea in the 1930s, is a fairly standard historical drama, but even in its conventionality it’s enthrallingly made. Before long, though, the movie transforms itself and repeatedly—in turns, it becomes a long con, a romantic comedy, a pornographic exploitation, a revenge thriller, and, briefly towards the end, a horror film. All of it is redeemed with the director’s wit and craft; it’s the purest kind of cinema in that it is the kind of fully immersive tale that can only be made on the big screen. In short, it transports you to another world, and lets you forget, for a time, about this world here, where Donald Trump was elected president.

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